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Hiking to Kjerag

Updated: Oct 29, 2023


At 1,084 metres above sea level, Kjerag is the highest peak in the Lysefjord and home to the world-famous boulder Kjeragbolten! The mountain plateau is also very popular among base jumpers and mountain climbers.


Season

Kjerag is a seasonal hiking destination. Before the county road between Sirdal and Lysebotn opens around the middle of May, Kjerag is considered to be accessible only to guests with special equipment and accompanied by a tour guide. The snow is deep and skis or snowshoes are required. The season ends when the road closes for the season due to snow conditions in October/November.

6–10 hour hike

The hike to Kjerag is around 11 kilometres long and the round trip takes 6 to 10 hours. You need to be in good physical shape before heading out on this mountain hike which has an elevation gain of 800 metres. In some places, you have to pull yourself up and slide down with the help of wires, so it is a demanding hike even for experienced hikers. The starting point is at the parking lot at Øygardstøl. Ask the staff in the parking lot about the current conditions – they will give you all the information you need. Be especially aware if it rains as the trail can get slippery.

Guided hikes

If you are inexperienced or feel unsure about doing the trip, we recommend that you join a guided hike. A good guide can turn a bad day into a fantastic experience.

Mountain safety tips

Every year, Norwegian volunteer rescue crews go into the mountains to retrieve travelers who have lost their way, are tired or injured, or have encountered problems after dark. These travelers are often dressed in everyday clothes and lack suitable equipment.

Do this:Research the length, duration, and recommended physical conditioning for the hike you want to do.

Check the weather conditions and always listen to local mountain residents.

Buy or rent the right equipment for your trip.

Always bring enough food, drinks, and an extra change of clothes in your backpack.

Check out the possibility of joining a guided tour

Avoid this:Do not wear jeans, trainers, or other everyday clothing.

Do not start your trip too late in the day, as you might risk having to hike in the dark.

Never start your mountain hike without being in good enough physical shape.

Do not depend on a map on your mobile device, as there is not always coverage in the mountains.

Don’t leave anything, including trash, behind.

Emergency telephone numbers


The Joint Rescue Coordination Center (JRCC) has the overall operational responsibility during mountain search and rescue operations.


51 51 70 00 – JRCC Southern Norway

75 55 90 00 – JRCC Northern Norway

For other emergencies:

110 – Fire112 – Police113 – Ambulance120 – Emergency at sea 22 59 13 00 –

 Poisons Information Center1412 TDD (textphone for the deaf or hearing impaired)

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